In 2015, as part of a class project in the CSU Fullerton Master of Ed Tech program, I applied to National CUE and ISTE. My applications were rejected but the following year I was accepted to both conferences. The only thing I did differently from one year to the next was to ask somebody for tips on the submission process and look at a successful proposal.

Fast forward to today, and I have shared at the National CUE Conference and the ISTE Conference for three years running. I honestly believe that all it took was a little guidance and some authentic examples, and that is why I am sharing all my presentation resources and submissions with you. These are some of my key points for you to consider when writing a major proposal.

  • Your activity should genuinely be about improving instruction and learning. People will attend your session because they want what is best for their students.
  • Share something that makes you stand out and you are passionate about. Don’t hop into a fad or gimmick, but be aware of current research and best practices.
  • Consider these conference session as a capstone to your year. This is your chance to share one of your best lessons/activities/pedagogy with highly motivated educators.
  • You should already be out and about presenting on similar topics! Attend CUE affiliate conferences and present!
  • You can write your proposal in one day but put thoughtful consideration in your session title and description. These small elements will have a significant impact on how many people attend your session.
  • You should probably follow the acceptance rubric, but I rarely do.

I almost forgot to mention that many people always say “who has time to do all that work and submit a proposal?” I did most of these proposals on the last submission day. I didn’t start working on my ISTE 2019 proposal until the night it was due. If you are already doing the work, it’s not that hard.

ISTE Submissions